VisionScienceList: Postdoc in Brain Slice Physiology

VisionScienceList Moderator (vslistmoderator@visionscience.com)
Mon, 26 Apr 1999 10:07:05 -0700

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Postdoctoral Position in Brain Slice Physiology

A NEI-funded position is available immediately for a project investigating
the role of nitric oxide in synaptic transmission. Techniques available to
the successful applicant include brain slice physiology; infrared,
low-light video microscopy, single and multielectrode recordings, and local
chemical activation/inactivation of visual pathways, including a unique
technique of delivering neuroactive substances through photolysis of caged
compounds (J. Neurosci. Methods 73:91-106). Excellent facilities include a
state of the art visualized patch suite with infrared DIC, a conventional
intracellular recording rig, an in vivo recording suite with visual
stimulus generation, extensive histology core facilities that are adjacent
to the lab, a calcium imaging core facility, and an energetic and attentive
mentor. Some knowledge of slice preparation and intracellular recording is
preferred, but motivated applicants will be trained.

Dwayne W. Godwin, Ph.D. Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy
Wake Forest University School of Medicine
Medical Center Blvd.
Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1010
Phone:336-716-9437
Fax: 336-716-4534
Email:dgodwin@wfubmc.edu
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<center><bold>Postdoctoral Position in Brain Slice Physiology

</bold></center><bold>

</bold>A NEI-funded position is available immediately for a project
investigating the role of nitric oxide in synaptic transmission.
Techniques available to the successful applicant include brain slice
physiology; infrared, low-light video microscopy, single and
multielectrode recordings, and local chemical activation/inactivation
of visual pathways, including a unique technique of delivering
neuroactive substances through photolysis of caged compounds (J.
Neurosci. Methods 73:91-106). Excellent facilities include a state of
the art visualized patch suite with infrared DIC, a conventional
intracellular recording rig, an in vivo recording suite with visual
stimulus generation, extensive histology core facilities that are
adjacent to the lab, a calcium imaging core facility, and an energetic
and attentive mentor. Some knowledge of slice preparation and
intracellular recording is preferred, but motivated applicants will be
trained.

Dwayne W. Godwin, Ph.D. Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy

Wake Forest University School of Medicine

Medical Center Blvd.

Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1010

Phone:336-716-9437

Fax: 336-716-4534

Email:dgodwin@wfubmc.edu

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